Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: Plenary presentations and discussions
    Visual summary of plenary presentations and discussions from day 1 of Evolving Perspectives on the demand for illegal wildlife products
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Reports


    The wild origin dilemma
    The sustainable production and trade of plants, animals, and their products, including through artificial propagation and captive breeding, is an important strategy to supply the global wildlife market, particularly when the trade in wild specimens is restricted by CITES or other wildlife trade legislation. However, these production methods can become a potential mechanism for the laundering of material illegally collected from the wild, leading to recent calls for the development of traceability methods to determine the origin of traded products.
    Amy Hinsley, David L. Roberts, The wild origin dilemma, In Biological Conservation, Volume 217, 2018, Pages 203-206, ISSN 0006-3207, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2017.11.011.
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Research Articles


    A review of the trade in orchids and its implications for conservation (Open Access)
    Orchids are one of the largest plant families and are commercially traded for a variety of purposes, including as ornamental plants, medicinal products and food. Much of this trade is the result of illegal harvest meaning that it is little documented and is absent from official statistics, at the same time as being of growing conservation concern.
    Amy Hinsley, Hugo J de Boer, Michael F Fay, Stephan W Gale, Lauren M Gardiner, Rajasinghe S Gunasekara, Pankaj Kumar, Susanne Masters, Destario Metusala, David L Roberts, Sarina Veldman, Shan Wong, Jacob Phelps; A review of the trade in orchids and its implications for conservation, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, , box083, https://doi.org/10.1093/botlinnean/box083
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Research Articles


    Elephant conservation debates must become more constructive
    The conservation of wildlife is complex and often contested. This is particularly the case when the species concerned is large, charismatic, with monetary value, and whose presence in an area can cause major direct impacts on people's lives. Such is the case for Africa's elephants, but it is true for other species as well, including big cats, large ungulates (hoofed mammals) and wolves. Conflicts over how to manage these species are widespread and challenging to resolve.
    via www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/opinion
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Blogs & Opinions


    Breaking the ivory deadlock to protect elephants
    The issue of whether ivory trading should be legalised to fund elephant conservation, or banned altogether, is long standing and widely debated. Both sides of the argument are so contentious that emotional investment can distort our understanding of the core issues.
    via www.ox.ac.uk/news
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Media Coverage


    To trade or not to trade? Breaking the ivory deadlock
    The debate over whether legal trading of ivory should be allowed to fund elephant conservation, or banned altogether to stop poaching has raged for decades without an end in sight.
    via www.uq.edu.au/news
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Media Coverage


    Breaking the deadlock on ivory
    Poaching for ivory has caused a steep decline in African elephant (Loxodonta africana) populations over the past decade. This crisis has fueled a contentious global debate over which ivory policy would best protect elephants: banning all ivory trade or enabling regulated trade to incentivize and fund elephant conservation. The deep-seated deadlock on ivory policy consumes valuable resources and creates an antagonistic environment among elephant conservationists. Successful solutions must begin by recognizing the different values that influence stakeholder cognitive frameworks of how actions lead to outcomes (“mental models”), and therefore their diverging positions on ivory trade.
    Duan Biggs, Matthew H. Holden, Alex Braczkowski, Carly N. Cook, E. J. Milner-Gulland, Jacob Phelps, Robert J. Scholes, Robert J. Smith, Fiona M. Underwood, Vanessa M. Adams, James Allan, Henry Brink, Rosie Cooney, Yufang Gao, Jon Hutton, Eve Macdonald-Madden, Martine Maron, Kent H. Redford, William J. Sutherland and Hugh P. Possingham. Breaking the deadlock on ivory. Science 358 (6369), 1378-1381. DOI: 10.1126/science.aan5215
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Research Articles


    Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: iTunes series
    Session recordings from Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: Evolving Perspectives on the demand for illegal wildlife products
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Videos & Media


    Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: Podcast series
    Session recordings from Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: Evolving Perspectives on the demand for illegal wildlife products
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Videos & Media


    CITES Trade Database
    Managed by the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) on behalf of the CITES Secretariat, the CITES Trade Database holds over 13 million records of trade in wildlife and over 34,000 scientific names of taxa listed in the CITES Appendices. Around a million records of trade in CITES-listed species of wildlife are currently reported annually and these data are entered into the CITES Trade Database (an Oracle relational database) as soon as they are received by UNEP-WCMC. CITES annual reports are the only available means of monitoring the implementation of the Convention and the level of international trade in specimens of species included in the CITES Appendices.
    Categories: Useful Links
    Download the Guide to Using the CITES Trade Database


    WildLabs
    WildLabs is a community of conservationists, technologists, engineers, data scientists, entrepreneurs and change makers - a community that shares information, ideas, tools and resources to discover and implement technology-enabled solutions to some of the biggest conservation challenges facing our planet.
    Categories: Useful Links


    Species+
    Authoritative information on taxonomy, legislation, distribution and trade in Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEA)-listed species. Species+, developed by UNEP-WCMC and the CITES Secretariat, is a website designed to assist Parties with implementing CITES, CMS and other MEAs. Species+ provides a centralised portal for accessing key information on species of global concern.
    Categories: Useful Links


    Wildlife Consumer Behaviour Change Toolkit
    Discussion forums, toolkits and resources for the Social and Behaviour Change Communications 'Community of Practice', created to support those working on changing behaviour to reduce consumer demand for illegal wildlife products. It brings together a wide range of best practice evidence, latest research findings and other resources from the field of consumer behaviour change, based on experience from the conservation sector and beyond.
    Categories: Useful Links


    Hunt Elephants to Save Them? Some Countries See No Other Choice
    Rachel Nuwer comments on the endless debates of elephant trophy hunting and yet “trophy hunting is not the issue. We should be focused on wildlife trafficking and the broader plight of elephants.”
    via www.nytimes.com
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Media Coverage


    Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: YouTube series
    Session recordings from Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: Evolving Perspectives on the demand for illegal wildlife products
    Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Videos & Media


    Legal Atlas
    A highly specialized, and customizable legal intelligence platform that can be used for a wide variety of activities.​ This includes easy access to global legislation on topics relating to illegal behaviour, environmental crime and wildlife regulations. It allows users to analyse and easily compare legislation between different countries.
    Categories: Useful Links


    Makers of wildlife hunting laws should consult local people
    Michael ‘t Sas-Rolfes explains why regulating wildlife hunting with legal interventions is both complicated and dynamic. Hunting is a hot topic right now, with opinions sharply divided over whether the Trump administration’s recent proposals to roll back some restrictions on trophy imports from certain countries in Africa would be a good or bad thing for wildlife conservation. To make sense of these debates, careful analysis of the impact of different types of hunting in Africa is much needed.
    via AFRICA SUSTAINABLE CONSERVATION NEWS
    Published: Nov 2017 | Categories: Blogs & Opinions


    Production timings could stem illegal wildlife laundering
    Research by Dr Dave Roberts in the School of Anthropology and Conservation has shown that understanding the growth rates of species could help flag up when an item being sold could only have come from the wild, thus identifying it as illegal.
    via https://www.kent.ac.uk/news
    Published: Nov 2017 | Categories: Media Coverage


    Are Traders and Traffickers Winning the Orchid Battle?
    Orchids are heavily exploited and traded, wanted for everything from decoration to food and medicine, but illegal collectors could be wiping out species before we even know they exist.
    via https://news.nationalgeographic.com
    Published: Nov 2017 | Categories: Media Coverage


    Does It Work for Biodiversity? Experiences and Challenges in the Evaluation of Social Marketing Campaigns.
    There is a growing realization among conservationists that human behavior is the main driver of all key threats to biodiversity and the environment. This realization has led to an escalation of the efforts to influence human behavior toward the adoption of more sustainable alternatives, more recently through the use of social marketing theory and tools. However, these initiatives have traditionally suffered from a lack of robust impact evaluation, which limits not only accountability but also a practitioner's ability to learn and improve over time.
    Diogo Veríssimo, Annalisa Bianchessi, Alejandro Arrivillaga, Fel Ceasar Cadiz, Roquelito Mancao, Kevin Green. Does It Work for Biodiversity? Experiences and Challenges in the Evaluation of Social Marketing Campaigns. Social Marketing Quarterly.
    Published: Oct 2017 | Categories: Research Articles


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