• Mon
    25
    Sep
    2017
    Wed
    27
    Sep
    2017
    St Catherine's College, Oxford, UK

    Evolving Perspectives on the Demand for Illegal Wildlife Products, will share new ideas and approaches to better understand and address this challenge, discuss practical and pragmatic possibilities to move forward and bridge the gap between academia and practice. This three-day event is being co-hosted with generous support from San Diego Zoo Global and TRAFFIC.

    The symposium will showcase case studies of best practice in understanding and addressing the illegal trade in wildlife products, with a particular focus on products used for medicinal value. Sharing new ideas and approaches for identifying consumers, changing consumer behaviour, and evaluating intervention impact.

    This will be an opportunity for people from different backgrounds and institutions who share a common interest in addressing the illegal wildlife trade to connect with one another. This will facilitate learning, raise awareness of potential synergies and collaborations, and catalyse new initiatives and partnerships. The symposium will thereby provide a much-needed opportunity for people to work together more effectively.

    More information

  • Sat
    07
    Oct
    2017
    Chester Zoo, UK

    The world is currently dealing with an unprecedented rise in illegal wildlife trade. It is one of the greatest direct threats to the future of many of the world’s most iconic species. The illegal wildlife trade affects thousands of species that are often already highly threatened and in danger of extinction.

    Chester Zoo is putting the spotlight on this lucrative international crime to highlight the devastating impact it's having on threatened species, what's being done to prevent it and how we can all help to make a difference.

    The one-day symposium will feature inspiring talks from experts working around the world, including Nafeesa Esmail and Dr Amy Hinsley.

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