Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: iTunes series
Session recordings from Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: Evolving Perspectives on the demand for illegal wildlife products
Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Videos & Media


Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: Podcast series
Session recordings from Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: Evolving Perspectives on the demand for illegal wildlife products
Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Videos & Media


CITES Trade Database
Managed by the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) on behalf of the CITES Secretariat, the CITES Trade Database holds over 13 million records of trade in wildlife and over 34,000 scientific names of taxa listed in the CITES Appendices. Around a million records of trade in CITES-listed species of wildlife are currently reported annually and these data are entered into the CITES Trade Database (an Oracle relational database) as soon as they are received by UNEP-WCMC. CITES annual reports are the only available means of monitoring the implementation of the Convention and the level of international trade in specimens of species included in the CITES Appendices.
Categories: Useful Links
Download the Guide to Using the CITES Trade Database


WildLabs
WildLabs is a community of conservationists, technologists, engineers, data scientists, entrepreneurs and change makers - a community that shares information, ideas, tools and resources to discover and implement technology-enabled solutions to some of the biggest conservation challenges facing our planet.
Categories: Useful Links


Species+
Authoritative information on taxonomy, legislation, distribution and trade in Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEA)-listed species. Species+, developed by UNEP-WCMC and the CITES Secretariat, is a website designed to assist Parties with implementing CITES, CMS and other MEAs. Species+ provides a centralised portal for accessing key information on species of global concern.
Categories: Useful Links


Wildlife Consumer Behaviour Change Toolkit
Discussion forums, toolkits and resources for the Social and Behaviour Change Communications 'Community of Practice', created to support those working on changing behaviour to reduce consumer demand for illegal wildlife products. It brings together a wide range of best practice evidence, latest research findings and other resources from the field of consumer behaviour change, based on experience from the conservation sector and beyond.
Categories: Useful Links


Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: Video series
Session recordings from Wildlife Trade Symposium 2017: Evolving Perspectives on the demand for illegal wildlife products
Published: Dec 2017 | Categories: Videos & Media


Legal Atlas
A highly specialized, and customizable legal intelligence platform that can be used for a wide variety of activities.​ This includes easy access to global legislation on topics relating to illegal behaviour, environmental crime and wildlife regulations. It allows users to analyse and easily compare legislation between different countries.
Categories: Useful Links


Makers of wildlife hunting laws should consult local people
Michael ‘t Sas-Rolfes explains why regulating wildlife hunting with legal interventions is both complicated and dynamic. Hunting is a hot topic right now, with opinions sharply divided over whether the Trump administration’s recent proposals to roll back some restrictions on trophy imports from certain countries in Africa would be a good or bad thing for wildlife conservation. To make sense of these debates, careful analysis of the impact of different types of hunting in Africa is much needed.
via http://environmentalresearchweb.org
Published: Nov 2017 | Categories: Blogs & Opinions


Production timings could stem illegal wildlife laundering
Research by Dr Dave Roberts in the School of Anthropology and Conservation has shown that understanding the growth rates of species could help flag up when an item being sold could only have come from the wild, thus identifying it as illegal.
via https://www.kent.ac.uk/news
Published: Nov 2017 | Categories: Media Coverage


Are Traders and Traffickers Winning the Orchid Battle?
Orchids are heavily exploited and traded, wanted for everything from decoration to food and medicine, but illegal collectors could be wiping out species before we even know they exist.
via https://news.nationalgeographic.com
Published: Nov 2017 | Categories: Media Coverage


Does It Work for Biodiversity? Experiences and Challenges in the Evaluation of Social Marketing Campaigns.
There is a growing realization among conservationists that human behavior is the main driver of all key threats to biodiversity and the environment. This realization has led to an escalation of the efforts to influence human behavior toward the adoption of more sustainable alternatives, more recently through the use of social marketing theory and tools. However, these initiatives have traditionally suffered from a lack of robust impact evaluation, which limits not only accountability but also a practitioner's ability to learn and improve over time.
Diogo Veríssimo, Annalisa Bianchessi, Alejandro Arrivillaga, Fel Ceasar Cadiz, Roquelito Mancao, Kevin Green. Does It Work for Biodiversity? Experiences and Challenges in the Evaluation of Social Marketing Campaigns. Social Marketing Quarterly.
Published: Oct 2017 | Categories: Journal Articles


Hidden in plain sight: the online face of the illegal wildlife trade
Having attended the International Conference on Environmental Crime, University of Cardiff, and the Oxford Martin Symposium on the Illegal Wildlife Trade, Laure Joanny summarises the key debates from panellists Anita Lavorgna, Joss Wright and David Roberts, all of whom carry out research into the illicit online trade in wildlife.
via https://biosecproject.org
Published: Oct 2017 | Categories: Blogs & Opinions


Assessing the extent of access and benefit sharing in the wildlife trade: lessons from horticultural orchids in Southeast Asia
The equitable sharing of benefits from natural resources is a key target of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Trade in its native species is one way in which a country can potentially benefit from its natural resources, and even small-scale traders can now access global markets online. However, little is known about the extent of benefit sharing for many products, and the extent to which the appropriate processes and permits are being used.
Amy Hinsley and David L. Roberts. (2017) Assessing the extent of access and benefit sharing in the wildlife trade: lessons from horticultural orchids in Southeast Asia. Environmental Conservation. Cambridge Core
Published: Sep 2017 | Categories: Journal Articles


Evaluating the Design of Behavior Change Interventions: A Case Study of Rhino Horn in Vietnam
Behavioral change interventions are increasingly widely used in conservation. Several projects addressing rhino horn consumption were recently launched in Vietnam. We used key informant interviews, document analysis, and marketing theory to explore their strategies for intervention design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. We developed a framework to evaluate whether they followed best practice and identify implementation challenges. Using best practice from other fields and considering demand reduction within the wider context of wildlife, trade policy will help address these challenges.
Olmedo, A., Sharif, V. and Milner-Gulland, E.J. (2017), Evaluating the Design of Behavior Change Interventions: A Case Study of Rhino Horn in Vietnam. CONSERVATION LETTERS. doi:10.1111/conl.12365
Published: Aug 2017 | Categories: Journal Articles


Programme Briefing Aug 2017
The Global Threat To Biodiversity From Wildlife Trade - A Major 21st Century Challenge
E.J. Milner-Gulland (Zoology) Joss Wright (Oxford Internet Institute)
Published: Aug 2017 | Categories: Reports
Download Illegal Wildlife Briefing (pdf)


The effectiveness of celebrities in conservation marketing
Celebrities are frequently used in conservation marketing as a tool to raise awareness, gen- erate funding and effect behaviour change. The importance of evaluating effectiveness is widely recognised in both marketing and conservation but, to date, little research into the effectiveness of celebrity endorsement as a tool for conservation marketing has been published.
Duthie E, Verıssimo D, Keane A, Knight AT (2017) The effectiveness of celebrities in conservation marketing. PLoS ONE 12(7): e0180027.
Published: Jul 2017 |


Bycatch and illegal wildlife trade on the dark web
The dark web has caught the attention of the conservation community because of the surge in interest in the illegal wildlife trade.
Roberts, D., & Hernandez-Castro, J. (2017). Bycatch and illegal wildlife trade on the dark web. Oryx, 51(3), 393-394. doi:10.1017/S0030605317000679
Published: Jun 2017 | Categories: Journal Articles


A roaring trade?
Lion bones have now joined elephant ivory and rhino horn as contentious commodities in the wildlife trade policy arena. This follows revelations of a growing export market of bones from deceased captive-bred lions from South Africa to Southeast Asia – and sharply divided opinions over how policy-makers should respond to this. Michael t' Sas-Rolfes talks about the major issues surrounding this contentious topic.
via https://www.iccs.org.uk
Published: Feb 2017 | Categories: Blogs & Opinions


Programme Launch Report
The Oxford Martin Programme on the Illegal Wildlife Trade was officially launched on December 2, 2016. Almost 50 stakeholders attended the meeting at the Oxford Martin School to celebrate the launch, present the programme's vision and receive feedback and ideas on its development (reflected in this report): http://www.illegalwildlifetrade.net/events/past-events/?event_id1=5
Published: Dec 2016 | Categories: Reports
Download Illegal Wildlife Trade Programme Launch Report


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